I enjoyed having an RV parked on a piece of property that our family owned for years. It was an excellent place for fishing and hiking, and we thoroughly enjoyed it. And, it didn’t cost anything for our RV to be parked there year round.

But what exactly are the laws and logistics about living in an RV on your land? Sure, it’s your property and you ought to do what you want with it. But is it actually possible to live in an RV on your property? There are many things to consider to make sure you are allowed to live in an RV on your property. First, you need to be sure that your land is zoned for an RV. And, you also need to make sure you have access to the right utility hookups. It’s also essential to be sure you maintain positive relationships with your neighbors, the Homeowners Association, and everyone else who may be impacted by your RV.

But how do you achieve all of this? We’ll answer these questions and more for you below. That way, you can decide for yourself whether RV living on your property is right for you.

The Legalities of Living in an RV on Your Own Property

The fact of the matter is that you must adhere to specific zoning rules and regulations when it comes to how you use your land. This includes whether or not you can live in an RV or camper on your property. If you’re within certain city limits, it’s pretty likely you won’t be able to do so. If you want to be confident you’re complying with your local laws, take these steps:

First, check the state laws where you live. Is there anything saying you can’t live in your RV on your property? If all is clear on the state level, then check the county and local ordinances. Does your county have any laws against it? What about your town? If you live within a city limit, you may be out of luck, but it’s always worth a shot to check.

Should your land pass all these steps, you’ll need to determine if your property is zoned for RV living. If it is, find out if you need to get a permit, because that’s one step you won’t want to forget. Zoning requirements for RV living control everything from neighborly issues to sanitation. Sometimes it’s difficult to understand the county regulations regarding housing. Very often, the rules regarding housing are clumped together, so it might be hard to figure out which rules apply specifically to RVs. If you need help, ask for help from one of the zoning employees at your county government office. I have found them to be very helpful with all sorts of zoning and permitting questions.

Figuring out whether or not you can live in your RV on your property might be a bit more complicated than you imagined. But it doesn’t mean “game over” for you and your RV lifestyle. As a responsible recreation enthusiast, it’s up to you to do your due diligence. That way, if someone tries to shut you down, you’ve got the law on your side!

Hooking Your RV Up to Your Utilities

Whether or not you can live on your property in your RV is more than just a legal matter. It’s a matter of logistics health and safety, too. Local or state safety and health regulations may require you to hook up to utilities on your land. After all, you can’t live in an RV without water, sewer, or power, because then you’d just be camping!

So, the next step in the process is to determine whether your property has the utilities you and your RV will need should you decide to live in it. Here’s a list of questions you can use to determine if the property has the proper utilities to support an RV. Whether you already own your land or are on the hunt for a property that’s right for your prospective lifestyle, you’ll need the answers to these questions.

  1. RV HookupsIs there access to potable water on the land?
  2. Does the ground support a septic system?
  3. Are public water and sewer connections available on the property?
  4. If need be, can the ground be cleared and leveled for proper parking and utility hookup?
  5. Is there road frontage?
  6. Will you need a permit for a driveway apron to access the property?
  7. What about access to electricity?
  8. Will you have access to phone and or internet service?

It may take some time to find an affordable, accessible, and enjoyable piece of RV-friendly property. However, if you’re determined to live in your RV, we’d say it’s worth it in the end.

Keep in mind that just because you have access to hooking utilities doesn’t mean it’s ok to live in your RV. Sometimes, zoning and permit regulations are in place to make sure you are living in a safe, clean, and neat manner. After all, RV living ought to be suitable for you as well as for the folks who live around you.

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RV Living and Homeowners Associations

Homeowners Associations, also known as HOAs, have many rules in place that are intended to preserve the value of a community. Therefore, some HOA’s have restrictions against RVs parked on private property within the community. Of course, your own HOAs decision of whether or not you can live in your RV on your front, side or back of your property depends on the community itself.

One of the primary considerations includes the class of RV. There are three main classes as well as a category of travel trailers: Class A recreational vehicles loosely match the measurements of a charter bus. They are often 35 feet in length or more. These RVs are the largest, and quite frankly, the most likely to be denied. Some reasons may be because they obstruct views or fail to fit snug in a single driveway.

Class B recreational vehicles look more like a van. Depending on height, these may not fit in a garage, but a driveway is a safe bet.

Class C recreational vehicles can range in size from 18 to 35 feet. Fitting one of these on your property depends on the size of your driveway or lawn.

Travel trailers tow behind a vehicle or truck. The size of these can vary significantly, from 20 feet long to over 40 feet long. If you’re looking to live in your RV in an HOA-managed community, it’s best to pick a vehicle that fits (quite literally) on your land nicely. In places such as these, the opinions of your neighbors matter more than you may realize.

Being Neighborly in Your Live-In RV

Some people choose a lifestyle that keeps them in contact with others; it feeds their need for socialization. Other people strategically elect a manner of living that puts them out of touch with others. They like the piece of quiet that accompanies a remote environment. Wherever you fall on the spectrum, there’s one thing that’s important to remember. Other people are living in this world can’t always appreciate our way of life. That’s why, if you wish to maintain your recreational vehicle existence, it’s crucial to remain neighborly.

If you plan on living in an RV, it’s always best to let your next door neighbors know ahead of time. This way you can discuss any of their concerns before you spend money to clear or level a spot only to find out you’re blocking your neighbor’s view. Any issues that arise regarding your RV living are best when dealt with firsthand.

It’s always best, in my opinion, to be friendly and talk to your neighbor about your plans ahead of time. If there’s one thing we’ve learned, what’s most important is going after the life we love to lead. For the RVer in you, this means keeping the neighbors pleased, too. In our book, whatever it takes to wake up in an RV every day is well worth the effort.

Other Considerations if You Are Looking for Property

If you are looking to purchase land to live in your RV, there are quite a few things to consider first.

1. Zoning and Permitting Requirements – as we discussed start here and see if the land even allows RVs

2. Power, Water, and Sewer – it can be very costly to add a well, septic field and electricity to your property. Instead of a septic field, you might be able to install a septic tank that will need to be pumped out every so often. And instead of electrcity, you may be able to install solar power. But all of these options cost serious money.

3. Phone and Cable – You may or may not want phone and cable but if you do are they accessible? If not, can you at least get a cell signal?

4. Location, Location, Location – Is the land convenient to grocery stores, shopping, or work? Is it safe? Is it quiet? What other development could be in the planning stage in the area around the property? It would be terrible to find the perfect property only to discover that a shopping center or shooting range is going to be built in the future near your property.

5. Clearing and Grading – how much will it cost to clear and level the land where you want to park your RV?

6. Access – Will you be required to (or have to) build an access road to your parking location? Some counties even require a permit to install a driveway apron which is the concrete the slopes up from the road to the beginning of your driveway.

Conclusion

Living in your RV on your own property can be a very inexpensive and practical lifestyle for you and your family. We hope this article can give you a starting point to helping you make the best decision regarding living in an RV on your own property.

For some really great info about parking an RV on your property check out our other helpful articles:

Do you have any advice to share about living in an RV on your own property? Please leave your comments below!

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